Human and Social Services (Online)

Bachelor of Science Degree (BS)
Human and Social Services - HEGIS Code 2101

The Bachelor of Science program in Human and Social Services is designed to prepare students for career positions in human service agencies and organizations. This may include positions such as case manager, social services supervisor, senior center administrator, job counselor, child welfare worker, group residence supervisor, information and referral specialist, outreach worker, public health worker or mental health associate. This is an interdisciplinary program that prepares students to assess the social and developmental needs of individuals and families—particularly of those who are considered at-risk or otherwise vulnerable—and either to participate directly in delivering the services required to address their needs, or to arrange and coordinate the delivery of quality services by others. The program offers three concentrations of study through the selection of three elective course tracks in Family Services, Gerontology Services, and Human Services Administration.

 

  • Analyze and apply theories, knowledge and skills to the scope of conditions that promote or inhibit human functioning to the range of populations served and needs addressed by human services.
  • Analyze and apply information in the service of clients or client groups with diverse needs such as the economically impoverished, physically challenged, intellectually impaired, and geriatric populations through development, design, implementation and evaluation of plans of action.
  • Demonstrate the administrative skills necessary for services delivery such as strategic planning and evaluation, leadership, supervision, budgeting and monitoring, grant and contract negotiations, and compliance with regulatory issues.
  • Employ logical approaches to real world problems in the human services fields that rely on the development of data-based research, program design, and evaluation methods to draw evidence-based conclusions.
  • Demonstrated ability to self-assess, self-correct and self-direct; to identify needs and sources of learning; and to know how to seek new knowledge and understanding.
 
Course No.   Semester
Credits

This course takes a realistic approach based on the principles of general psychology and is designed to assist the student in coping with life situations. Included are theories of personality, emotions, character, motivation, environmental influences, and the development of students.

Number: GEN161
Credits:
3.00
Type: General Education

The purpose of this course is to examine the broad range of service and functions of the human service professional in his or her workplace. You will become knowledgeable about the many roles and functions of the human service professional, gain an understanding of the types of agencies where human service professionals are employed, and be exposed to an overview of the human service profession. The course will help you understand important issues related to the development of effective human service and assist you in seeing the importance of ethical, professional, legal, and multicultural issues in the human services profession. This course is the first course in your educational career to become a professional in the human services field.

Number: HMS110
Credits: 3.00
Type: Human Services

This course provides a general overview of counseling theories, an introduction to counseling techniques, the conditions, which facilitate an effective counseling relationship, and stages in the counseling process. Students will be introduced to the foundational counseling theories that will be necessary for the student’s success in more advanced counseling courses. This experiential course will emphasize practice as well as didactic information. Students will be introduced to the “common factors” that have been found through empirical research to have a significant impact on client satisfaction and therapeutic outcome, as such Aponte and Kissil’s “the person of the therapist” and style, the therapeutic relationship, and techniques that cut across different models. It is hoped that students not only develop a working knowledge of the major counseling theories but also how these theories create an environment for change in clients. Introduction to process recordings.

Prerequisite: HMS110

Number: HMS120
Credits: 3.00
Type: Human Services

Global issues such as world hunger, human rights, and nuclear war, as well as American issues concerning inequalities of wealth, civil rights, crime and the role of government are examined in this course. In addition to gaining an understanding of the social, political, and economic dimensions of these issues, students will also consider the underlying values and ethics.

Number: GEN167
Credits: 3.00
Type: General Education

This course is designed to introduce students to social science research and to develop student research and analytical skills. Students are introduced to the theory and logic of research, the ethics that guide the research process, and to the range of research methods generally employed in the social sciences. Attention will be paid to research design, data collection, elementary data analysis, and report writing. The course includes discussion of specific methodological approaches. Students completing this course will have a better understanding of how to conduct their own research in the fields of Human Services as well as a better understanding of how to evaluate the research of others.

Prerequisites: HMS110

Number: HMS210
Credits: 3.00
Type: Human Services

This course examines the history and evolution of case management as a human service delivery strategy. Case management models will be examined within the context of socio-cultural determinants that have shaped the evolution of case management from early inception to today, including economic downturns and continuing financial struggles for individuals, families, communities, and states, federal legislation, emerging client groups, technology, shifting demographics, funding challenges, new service delivery models. Students will learn about the phases of the assessment process, along with strategies to develop strength-based assessments and service plans. The ethical dimensions and challenges faced by case managers will be explored as students engage in activities that emphasize quality service delivery, cultural competence and strategies to promote professional growth, clinical supervision, wellness, self-care, and continuing education. Of particular emphasis is the concept of advocacy and ways case managers may become involved in individual, community, and policy advocacy including the concepts of micro, mezzo and macro resources and their impact on individuals and families. A new model of case management, called adaptive social service leadership, will be presented as a way to help case managers respond to the dynamic nature of social services in today’s world.

Prerequisites: HMS110 and HMS120

Number: HMS220
Credits: 3.00
Type: Human Services

(ONLINE PROGRAM ONLY)
The capstone course draws upon knowledge acquired throughout the program, synthesized through a final project that reflects students’ individual interests, skills and professional goals. The purpose of this class is to reflect upon learning experiences, demonstrate ability to organize thoughts, ideas and materials, offer support to fellow students, and demonstrate their preparation and readiness for work. The course applies the social science theory theories and best practices of evidence analysis to current events and reviews the theoretical foundations of the economics, political science and sociology disciplines.
Prerequisites: The Capstone course must be taken in the tenth or eleventh term of a student’s online degree program.

Number: HMS280
Credits: 3.00
Type: Human Services

This course is designed to expand the knowledge base of future human services professionals as well as all members of society to better understand and support the diverse needs and interests of individuals with disabilities. The course will introduce class members to the concept of disability and the field of special education. We will examine the history, etiology, and characteristics of specific categories of disability labels as well as educational and other federally mandated programs designed to support the inclusion of individuals with disabilities in schools and communities. Topics germane to the study of disability, disability justice, and the field of special education will also be explored, including current controversies and trends.

Prerequisites: HMS110, HMS220

Number: HMS310
Credits: 3.00
Type: Human Services

This course focuses on issues of diversity, oppression and social justice as well as methods of inclusion. It is designed to prepare CW’s Human Services program students to be knowledgeable of people’s biases based on race, ethnicity, culture, religion, age, sex, sexual orientation, social and economic status, political ideology, disability and how these contribute to discrimination and oppression. Students will learn about diverse cultures, family structure, roles, immigration and assimilation experiences of marginalized groups. Students will also learn about the influence of dominant culture on these diverse and marginalized (population at risk) groups, as well as the potential for gender fluidity, which can add to marginalization, and the opportunities for understanding and inclusion.

Prerequisites: HMS110

Number: HMS320
Credits: 3.00
Type: Human Services

This course is designed to acquaint the student with a richer understanding of loss through the life span. The course of grief varies with individuals and change resulting from loss can be transformative or life threatening as each person strives to entertain new meanings and review long-held assumptions. In addition to examining the variations in an individual's path through grief and loss, a more general grieving paradigm will be presented. Students will gain a more complex understanding of how age and developmental stage affect perceptions and coping style. Special types of losses will be reviewed. Students will have the opportunity to practice helpful responses to loss as they learn how to facilitate healthy adaptation to change. A specific focus on death and dying and related treatment concerns will also be addressed.

Prerequisites: HMS110 and HMS220

Number: HMS410
Credits: 3.00
Type: Human Services

This course is designed to familiarize the students with small groups function. The course will highlight some of the dynamics of group process, as well as how people communicate in groups. Issues related to selecting participants, deciding structure, methods of decision of making and ethical practice will be discussed. Group Dynamics explores the various stages of therapeutic groups, including group development. Emphasis is on basic group theory, process, and effective practice skills. Students are acquainted with task-oriented and treatment-oriented groups in a broad range of settings. This course may incorporate experiential learning where students learn about group processes via group exercises in class.

Prerequisites: HMS110, HMS201 and HMS220

Number: HMS420
Credits: 3.00
Type: Human Services

(ONLINE PROGRAM ONLY)
The purpose of this class is to reflect upon learning experiences, demonstrate ability to organize thoughts, ideas and materials for written proposals, receive and offer support to fellow students, accept and handle criticism and gain greater self-awareness of one’s preparation and readiness for work using a project management skill set. The course applies social science theory and best practices of evidence analysis to current events and reviews the theoretical foundations of the economics, political science and sociology disciplines. Students will evaluate the comparative utilities of these disciplines in analyzing social problems, and apply them to specific social policy dilemmas. Through a mixture of discussions and written analyses, students will review major theories, organize and relate theoretical principles to evidence about real-world problems and gain experience analyzing decision-making difficulties that attend important social policy subjects.
Prerequisites: The Capstone course must be taken in the final two semesters of a student’s online degree program.

Number: HMS480*
Credits: 3.00
Type: Human Services

This course will provide a framework for developing and analyzing a range of health policy issues as well as a comprehensive introduction to public health concepts and practices. This course will also address important health issues and problems facing the public health system. Case studies and a variety of practice-related exercises serve as a basis for learner participation in real world public health problem-solving simulations. The various components of these courses aim to stimulate interactions among learners and instructors around important problems and issues facing public health. This course will also provide an orientation to the ethical foundations of public health research and identify resources for encouraging the ethical practice of public health.

Prerequisite: Junior-level standing or permission of the Chair

Number: HCA400
Credits: 3.00
Type: Health Professions

This course examines the human dynamics in organizations, focusing on individuals and small groups within them. Students will learn a wide range of interpersonal skills needed to succeed in most business occupations. In addition, students will learn how to identify group goals, understand the different needs of group members, accomplish group tasks, and effectively communicate within groups.

Number: GEN241
Credits: 3.00
Type: General Education

In this course students will learn how to create effective content for online communication, including text-based graphics and verbiage for compelling social media posts. Students will analyze successful social media campaigns and determine the impact of hashtags, photos, videos, and sponsored ads. Software and social media tools for analytics, community engagement and content creation will be explored.

Number: GEN245
Credits: 3.00
Type: General Education

This course will examine how communication can be used to effectively resolve conflicts between people, organizations, and cultures. Conflicts resulting from differences in gender and ethnicity in the contexts of work and personal relationships will also be emphasized. The course will have an interdisciplinary emphasis through the use of cases from history, psychology, sociology, and current events.

Prerequisite: Junior Level Status or Permission of Chair.

Number: GEN363
Credits: 3.00
Type: General Education

In this course, students will examine the concepts and applications of Microsoft Word & PowerPoint. Students will use these technology tools to create business documents, marketing materials, and develop effective business presentations that will prepare them for today’s information based business environment.

Number: BUS122
Credits: 3.00
Type: Business Administration

This course will provide the framework for understanding concepts and theories related to management across a variety of business sectors including for-profit, not-for-profit, and government-operated organizations. Students will learn how institutions are organized and governed, the role of various employee classes, and the management systems designed for their efficient and effective operation.

Prerequisite: Junior level status or permission of Chair

Number: BUS325
Credits: 3.00
Type: Business Administration

This course will examine the role that external fundraising plays in non-profit organizations and the means through which funds are raised from government, individuals, foundations and corporations. The importance of stewardship, program evaluation, and the role of the board and staff in developing effective fundraising strategies will be addressed. Legal development and structure of fundraising organizations will also be introduced. Students will come to understand the role that fundraising plays in supporting the budgetary needs of non-profit and social service agencies, sources through which such funding can be secured, and the methods of successfully courting, writing, and stewarding external fundraising. The focus will be on developing and implementing comprehensive marketing and fundraising strategies using ethically based approaches.

Prerequisites: Junior-level standing or permission of chair

Number: BUS330
Credits: 3.00
Type: Business Administration

This course introduces Excel spreadsheet concepts using software in the Windows environment. Topics to be covered include: creating the Excel worksheet, formulas, functions, enhancing spreadsheets with graphs and charts, analyzing spreadsheet data (what–if analysis) and working with large worksheets.

Number: ACC127
Credits: 3.00
Type: Accounting

  Total Major-Related Credits 63
     
  * Online Division students taking their Human and Social Services Capstone II (HMS480) will take this over two terms. This course is broken into two courses as listed below:

HMS480A Human and Social Services Capstone II A
HMS480B Human and Social Services Capstone II B
 
     
Course No.   Semester
Credits
GEN105 Transformative Learning » 3

This course will introduce students to the value of change, personal growth, and transformation. Students will engage in activities designed to stimulate reflective thinking, create a positive personal outlook, and foster “behaviors of success.”

Number: GEN105
Credits: 3.00
Type: General Education

The objective of this course is to familiarize students with digital technologies as they are being used in the workplace today, and explore how emerging technologies are likely to continue to evolve. Students will be exposed to digital technology fundamentals to better position them to readily adopt common workplace technologies. Students will also learn about security concerns, ethical considerations, digital communications etiquette, and other important concepts related to the use of digital technologies.

Number: GEN115
Credits: 3.00
Type: General Education

In this course, students develop their reading comprehension and written communication skills. Different styles of writing are examined as students develop writing proficiency through practice in planning, outlining, drafting, revising and editing. In addition to regular class meeting times, Day Division students are required to participate in a ten-week Writing Lab component which counts as ten percent of the grade for English Composition. For the Day Division, the Writing Lab is graded as Pass or Fail.

Note: Writing Lab is not required in the Evening division or for fully online programs.

Prerequisite: Proficiency Examination and/or ACE108

Number: GEN125
Credits: 3.00
Type: General Education

This course builds on skills developed in English Composition I by presenting additional writing styles and helping students further refine their writing skills. Research skills and MLA documentation are also introduced. In addition to regular class meeting times, Day Division students are required to participate in a ten-week Writing Lab component which counts as ten percent of the grade for English Composition. For the Day Division, the Writing Lab is graded as Pass or Fail.

Note: Writing Lab is not required in the Evening division or for fully online programs.

Prerequisite: GEN125 or permission of Chair

Number: GEN127
Credits: 3.00
Type: General Education

Communication skills require good speech habits. Therefore, this course covers organization of thoughts, voice control, diction, and presentation of ideas to a variety of audiences. The art of listening is also studied. Emphasis will be placed on a series of oral presentations in order to acquire and reinforce these skills.

Number: GEN129
Credits: 3.00
Type: General Education

This course will provide complimentary sessions to Foundations of Math in fundamental mathematics. Ratios, percentages, proportions, descriptive statistics, word problems, basic geometry, and an introduction to algebra will be covered. The course provides a sound understanding in basic math concepts necessary for future math courses.

Prerequisite: Proficiency exam and/or ACE106

Number: GEN147
Credits: 3.00
Type: General Education

This course is a study of the institutions of American and global political governments. It is an in-depth examination of national and international governments and politics. The course emphasizes the comparative study of political institutions, ideologies, political cultures, participation, and party systems in the United States and selected nations of the world. Patterns of political change and global interactions with reference to current issues will be studied.

Number: GEN171
Credits: 3.00
Type: General Education

This course is designed to provide a culminating experience in business communications and professional development. Covered in this course are advanced English usage essential to written business document creation and oral presentations. Using individual participation and demonstration methods, students will be trained in interviewing techniques and in developing professional demeanors vital to career success.

Prerequisite: GEN127 or permission of Chair.

Number: GEN224
Credits: 3.00
Type: General Education

This course will introduce the student to the moral principles and standards that guide behavior in today’s complex society and business. The definition and application of moral philosophies are used to explore ethical decision-making using a case study approach. Economic, legal, and social dimensions are explored along with interpersonal relationships and the development of morality within individual thinking.

Number: GEN250
Credits: 3.00
Type: General Education

This course builds upon the introductory GEN157 Statistics course and offers an introduction to additional statistical concepts and applications. Topics to be discussed in detail include: correlation and regression, sampling distributions and the central limit theorem, estimation using confidence intervals, and hypothesis testing. This course also illustrates how statistics are used in the business world as well as in the media, and the benefits and drawbacks of statistical information.

Prerequisite: GEN157

Number: GEN305
Credits: 3.00
Type: General Education

This course focuses on the adult years as a complex and extraordinarily variable process, rather than as an orderly sequence of predictable stages. Through experiential, interactive processes, this course will explore various theories and philosophies of adult physical, cognitive, and personality development. Attention will also be given to the larger social contexts and the adult’s experience as worker and learner.

Prerequisite: Sophomore Level Status or Permission of Chair.

Number: GEN330
Credits: 3.00
Type: General Education

This writing seminar is designed for bachelor degree students. Its focus will be on the importance of analysis and interpretation in the business and professional writing process. Students will learn how to write thoughtful, expressive, and well-developed documents for colleagues or management.

Prerequisite: Junior Level Status or Permission of Chair.

Number: GEN342
Credits: 3.00
Type: General Education

This course will emphasize the necessary written, oral, and visual communication needed for today’s global business environment. The course is designed to provide a basic understanding of the importance of professionalism in the workplace, especially in the competitive business environment. Both interpersonal skills as well as research skills will be developed throughout the course. Throughout the semester, students will learn how utilizing creative skills and being flexible will be valuable in many career scenarios.

Prerequisites: GEN342 or BUS324, and Junior Level Status, or Permission of Chair.

Number: GEN421
Credits: 3.00
Type: General Education

This course introduces students to the basic concepts of human biology and chemistry in preparation for further study in the Allied Health Sciences. Biological concepts of cell theory, cell cycle, and cell reproduction will be explored and the major systems of the human body will be introduced. Chemistry concepts of atoms, molecules, and elements will be introduced along with biological molecules. Appropriate medical terminology will be introduced and utilized to accurately communicate in the biological and medical sciences. Emphasis is placed on body system components and function as it relates to human diseases.

Students will take MED103 either as a co-requisite or prior to this course offering.

Number: MSC110
Credits: 3.00
Type: Health Professions

  Total General Education Credits 42
     
  Electives  
  Concentration Electives (2) 6
  General Education Electives (2) 6
  Open Elective (1) 3
  Total Elective Credits 15
Course No. Family Services Concentration Semester
Credits
HMS330 Child and Adolescent Development » 3

This course is an introduction to the theoretical concepts and methodological approaches in child and adolescent development. Developmental processes through maturation and learning will be examined. Different theoretical perspectives (biological, cognitive, social, behavioral, emotional, and evolutionary) will be explored and relevant research discussed. This course explores the principles and theories of normal child growth and development from birth through adolescence. The course will focus on the physical, social, emotional and cognitive domains of development and their application. Topics include well-known theories of development, developmental milestones, the internal and external influences of culture, family and the community on child and youth development, and the developmental assets children and youth need to succeed.

Prerequisites: HMS110 and HMS210

Number: HMS330
Credits: 3.00
Type: Human Services

Through this course students will learn to apply the various sociological theories and research methods appropriate to the study of intimate relationships, marriages, and families, and examine the impact and influence the social institution of marriage maintains on the formation and alteration of human relationships in the past, present, and future and how those impacts are related to people’s lives. The course will explore and examine social, economic, and policy trends related to the changing nature of marriages and families within the U.S. and globally and students will learn to critically analyze topics related to intimate relationships, marriage, and family life and how those topics are related to family life choices, attitudes regarding relationships, marriage and family, maintaining healthy/effective relationships, the relationship between family/relationship well-being and various dimensions of health, etc.

Prerequisites: Junior-level standing or permission of chair

Number: HMS430
Credits: 3.00
Type: Human Services

     
Course No. Gerontology Concentration  
HCA420 Long Term Care Administration » 3

This course describes long-term delivery programs designed to meet the special needs of seniors. It will review care and service systems from the perspective of an aging population including the physiological and psychological changes common among seniors. The purpose of this course is to acquaint students with the dynamic field of long term care. This course helps students examine the issues, challenges, and dilemmas confronting long term care management and others in the field of long term health services.

Prerequisite: Junior-level standing or permission of the Chair

Number: HCA420
Credits: 3.00
Type: Health Professions

HCA410 Aging Population and Healthcare » 3

This course provides an overview of the aging population, implications for individuals, families, and society, and the background for health policy related to the aging population. This course presents an overview of aging from the perspective of demographics, functional capacity and disability, epidemiology of diseases in the elderly, federal and state health policies affecting the elderly, social aspects of aging, and the ethical considerations in the care of the elder population.

Prerequisite: Junior-level standing or permission of the Chair

Number: HCA410
Credits: 3.00
Type: Health Professions

     
Course No. Human Services Administration Concentration  
BUS123 Human Resources Management » 3

Provides the foundation for the contemporary theory and practices relating to the management of people through a behavioral approach. Major attention is devoted to the process of personnel procurement, development and maintenance of human resources. This includes sound practices in selection, training, motivation and compensation of employees.

Number: BUS123
Credits: 3.00
Type: Business Administration

BUS203 Principles of Management » 3

A thorough study of the most modern management methods. Analyzes the areas of organizing, planning, staffing, directing and controlling the organization. Examines the relationship of individuals in line and staff positions and the nature and interaction of the activities.

Number: BUS203
Credits: 3.00
Type: Business Administration

120 CREDITS REQUIRED FOR GRADUATION