Computer Networking Specialist

Certificate – Hegis Code 5199
The Computer Networking Specialist program provides a concentrated curriculum in Computer Network Administration. This program is suggested for students with previous computer knowledge. Students study administration, design, support and maintenance of local area and wide area networks through lecture and using Microsoft Windows operating systems and Cisco IOS. This program prepares students for career opportunities in the com­puter networking field. Credits are transferable to the associate degree program, Computer Network Administration.



 

"Technology impacts every area of our lives. Understanding the uses of technology and becoming an expert in the field of Information Technology (IT) provides an individual with a cutting edge career opportunity. It's my goal to share with my students the knowledge and skills necessary to become an IT expert. It's my desire that through interactive class sessions, hands-on and virtual labs, and individual and team-based assignments students will take hold of my respect and love for technology, apply their knowledge and skills, and succeed with a career in Information Technology."

Dr. Grace Bonanno headshot  />
                    <span class=Dr. Grace Bonanno
Chairperson and Professor, Computer Networking
Certifications: MCSE, CCNA, CCAI, Network+, MCSA, Security+ v






This course is designed to provide students with the knowledge and troubleshooting skills needed to provide capable hardware support of personal computers. Students will identify proper procedures for installing and configuring system components and devices; diagnose and troubleshoot system problems; identify safety procedures; identify motherboards, types of memory, bus architectures and CMOS; define the print process and identify procedures for servicing printers; identify the components of portable systems; define networks. This course is designed to help students prepare for one of two CompTIA A+ exams.

Number: NET111
Credits: 3.00
Type: Network Administration
School: School of Information Technology

This course is designed to provide students with the knowledge and troubleshooting skills needed to provide capable software support of personal computers. Students will learn the basic system administration knowledge of command line prompt and Windows operating systems for installing, configuring, upgrading, troubleshooting, and repairing desktop computer systems. This course is designed to help students prepare for one of two CompTIA A+ exams.
Prerequisite: NET111 or permission to waive.

Number: NET117
Credits: 3.00
Type: Network Administration
School: School of Information Technology)

This course provides students with an overview of networking terminology and protocols. Topics to be discussed include local area networks (LANs) and wide area networks (WANs), Open Systems Interconnection (OSI) model, cabling and cabling tools, routers and basic routing protocol configuration, Ethernet technologies, Internet Protocol (IP) addressing, and an introduction to wireless networking concepts and terminology. This is the first course of a four course Cisco Academy program that is designed to help students prepare for the Cisco Certified Network Associate (CCNA) exam. In addition, this course is designed to help students prepare for the entry-level certification exam, Cisco Certified Entry Network Technician (CCENT).
Prerequisite: NET111 or permission to waive.

Number: NET125
Credits: 3.00
Type: Network Administration
School: School of Information Technology

This course presents an overview of the Windows operating system used as a client in a client/server network. Students will install, configure and troubleshoot the Windows operating system; setup and manage user accounts and groups; install and configure network protocols; configure printers and secure, administer and audit resources. This course is designed to help students prepare for a Microsoft Certified Technology Specialist (MCTS) certification exam.
Prerequisite: NET125 or permission to waive.

Number: NET143
Credits: 3.00
Type: Network Administration
School: School of Information Technology

Topics include the fundamentals of algebra including the rules of numbers, equations, negative numbers and integers, fractions and rational numbers, exponents, inequalities, graphs and linear equations. Emphasis will be placed on word problems and business applications.
Prerequisite: Proficiency exam and/or ACE106 or permission to waive.

Number: GEN151
Credits: 3.00
Type: General Education
School: School of Information Technology

This course presents an overview of the Windows operating system used as a server in a client/server network. Students will install, configure and troubleshoot a Windows server; examine the file systems; plan, implement and administer Active Directory Services; administer print services; examine network protocols and services; monitor and optimize system resources. This course is designed to help students prepare for a Microsoft Certified Technology Specialist (MCTS) certification exam.
Prerequisite: NET143 or permission to waive.

Number: NET151
Credits: 3.00
Type: Network Administration
School: School of Information Technology

This course is a continuation of the Cisco Academy program. This course is designed to give students the skills needed to perform router configurations. Topics include IP Subnetting/VLSM/CIDR, static and dynamic routing and routing protocols including RIPv1 & v2, EIGRP, and OSPF. This is the second course of a four course Cisco Academy program that is designed to help students prepare for the Cisco Certified Network Associate (CCNA) exam.
Prerequisite: NET125 or permission to waive.

Number: NET161
Credits: 3.00
Type: Network Administration
School:School of Information Technology

Communication skills require good speech habits. Therefore, this course covers organization of thoughts, voice control, diction and presentation of ideas to a variety of audiences. The art of listening is also studied. Emphasis will be placed on a series of oral presentations in order to acquire and reinforce these skills.

Number: GEN129
Credits: 3.00
Type: General Education
School:School of Information Technology

This course provides students with the skills to implement and administer a Windows network operating system in medium to large environments. Topics will include installing, managing, monitoring, configuring and troubleshooting DNS, DHCP, remote access, network protocols, IP routing in a Windows network infrastructure. This course is designed to help students prepare for a Microsoft Certified Technology Specialist (MCTS) certification exam.
Prerequisite: NET151 or permission to waive.

Number: NET223
Credits: 3.00
Type: Network Administration
School: School of Information Technology

This course is designed to provide a culminating experience in business communications and professional development. Covered in this course is advanced English usage essential to written business document creation and oral presentations. Using individual participation and demonstration methods, students will be trained in interviewing techniques and in developing professional demeanors vital to career success. This course does not satisfy the General Education requirement for AOS degrees.
Prerequisite: GEN127 or permission to waive.

Number: GEN224
Credits: 3.00
Type: General Education
School: School of Information Technology

This course is a continuation of the Cisco Academy program. This course is designed to give students the skills needed to perform initial switch configuration tasks and to troubleshoot common network problems. Other topics include Virtual LANs (VLANs), interVLAN routing, VLAN Trunking Protocol (VTP) and RSTP operation. This is the third course of a four course Cisco Academy program that is designed to help students prepare for the Cisco Certified Network Associate (CCNA) exam.
Prerequisite: NET125 or NET161 or permission to waive.

Number: NET261
Credits: 3.00
Type: Network Administration
School: School of Information Technology

This course is a continuation of the Cisco Academy program. This course is designed to give students the skills needed to perform advanced TCP/IP techniques such as DHCP and DNS. Other topics include Access Control Lists (ACLs), WAN concepts and technology such as PPP and Frame Relay. This is the fourth course of a four course Cisco Academy program that is designed to help students prepare for the Cisco Certified Network Associate (CCNA) exam.
Prerequisite: NET261 or permission to waive.

Number: NET263
Credits: 3.00
Type: Network Administration
School: School of Information Technology

This course is designed to provide students with the technical know how about the implementation of the Windows directory service. Students will understand how to make directory services work for an organization as well as plan, implement and manage directory services. Topics will include understanding the logical and physical structure of directory services; configuring the Domain Name System (DNS) server service to support directory services; creating and administering user accounts and group resources; directory objects and Group Policy. This course is designed to help students prepare for a Microsoft Certified Technology Specialist (MCTS) certification exam.
Prerequisite: NET151 or permission to waive.

Number: NET203
Credits: 3.00
Type: Network Administration
School: School of Information Technology

This course is designed to prepare students to become foundational-level IT network practitioners. Through scenario-based assignments, students will be presented with the opportunity to perform real world tasks in a simulated environment. Students will implement, configure, maintain, secure, and troubleshoot network architectures. This course will help prepare students for the TestOut Network Pro certification exam and the CompTIA Network+ certification exam.
Prerequisite: NET151

Number: NET125
Credits: 3.00
Type: Network Administration
School:School of Information Technology

  Total Credits 42
     
  Electives  
  Electives (2)* 6
  Total Elective Credits* 6
  *Students who have not previously passed 6 college credits of English Composition or passed the English Proficiency Tests are required to take English Composition I (GEN125) and English Composition II (GEN127) as electives.  
Course No.   Semester
Credits
ACC107 Financial Accounting I » 3

Students taking Financial Accounting I will be involved in accounting theory and its applications. In addition, there will be an in-depth study of the nature of assets and liabilities such as: cash, receivables, short-term investments, inventories, plant & equipment, intangibles and the preparation of financial statements. During the semester, emphasis will be placed on journal entries, posting, preparation of month-end financial statements as well as closing and adjusting entries.

Number: ACC107
Credits: 3.00
Type: Accounting
School: School of Information Technology

Students continuing on to Financial Accounting II will be focusing more on the topics in corporate accounting such as: contributed capital, stock rights, convertible securities, retained earnings and earnings per share. The course will also focus on procedures for a merchandising business which includes: accounts receivables, notes and interest, types of inventory systems and inventory valuation, accounting for long-term assets and related depreciation methods. In addition, the course covers bond discounts and premiums, statement of cash flows, analysis of financial statements including comparative analysis and liquidity, profitability and leverage measurement.
Prerequisite: ACC107 or permission to waive

Number: ACC108
Credits: 3.00
Type: Accounting
School: School of Information Technology

This course briefly reviews the history of taxation, tax legislation and research and covers the Internal Revenue Code and Regulations. Methods and forms required to complete tax returns are carefully examined and completed.
Prerequisite: ACC107 or permission to waive

Number: ACC206
Credits: 3.00
Type: Accounting
School: School of Information Technology

This course examines the nature and many types of fraudulent business and accounting activities prevalent in today’s technologically advanced world. The course uses real life cases and business examples to teach students how to identify, detect, investigate and prevent fraud.

Number: ACC229
Credits: 3.00
Type: Accounting
School: School of Information Technology

This course allows students to explore a variety of industries of interest to them. The structure of the organizations, competitive activity, consumer attitudes as well as the job functions needed to make each successful will be examined. Students will engage in group discussions regarding the importance of the industry to the consumer and the economy. Students will complete this introductory course with a broad knowledge that can be streamlined to a specific industry in courses that follow

Number: BUS103
Credits: 3.00
Type: Business Administration

This course surveys the general nature of marketing concepts, process, organization and buyer behavior. It also examines the basic decision areas of product, distribution, promotion, pricing and society’s interaction with the dynamics of marketing.

Number: BUS112
Credits: 3.00
Type: Business Administration

Provides the foundation for the contemporary theory and practices relating to the management of people through a behavioral approach. Major attention is devoted to the process of personnel procurement, development and maintenance of human resources. This includes sound practices in selection, training, motivation and compensation of employees.
Prerequisite: BUS103 or MED111 or permission to waive

Number: BUS123
Credits: 3.00
Type: Business Administration
School: School of Information Technology

A thorough study of the most modern management methods. Analyzes the areas of organizing, planning, staffing, directing and controlling the organization. Examines the relationship of individuals in line and staff positions and the nature and interaction of the activities.
Prerequisite: BUS103 or MED111 or permission to waive
Prerequisite: BUS103 or MED111 or permission to waive. Accounting majors (Associate and/or BBA degree students) are exempt from the prerequisite BUS103 Intro to Business Ventures

Number: BUS203
Credits: 3.00
Type: Business Administration
School: School of Information Technology

This course examines the historical aspects of the banking system and the important role of the Federal Reserve System. Through a study of the internal operations and regulations of banking institutions, the student will gain knowledge of the effects of banking on the economy. Topics to be discussed are the functions of savings banks, commercial banks, investment companies, credit agencies and foreign currency.

Number: BUS216
Credits: 3.00
Type: Business Administration
School: School of Information Technology

A practical approach to learning the basic phases of the sales process necessary to become a successful salesperson and employee: approach, demonstration, sales resistance, closing, selling through suggestion, product knowledge and analysis. The course relates the importance of communication to successful living and employment through development of poise, demeanor, style of dress, sales ethics, influencing people, behavior patterns, buying and motives.
Prerequisite: BUS103 or permission to waive

Number: BUS230
Credits: 3.00
Type: Business Administration
School: School of Information Technology

This course provides a survey of the areas of personal financial matters. The course content guides each person towards receiving results in the following areas: financial planning; buying on credit; borrowing money; using bank services; selecting from various types of insurance coverages; home ownerships vs renting; obtaining investment information; investing in stocks and bonds; budgeting; retirement planning and estate planning.

Number: BUS245
Credits: 3.00
Type: Business Administration

The elements of product, price, promotion and place are applied to the EMS offerings. Students will examine teams, groups and individuals to understand what sells and what doesn’t. This course will require students to develop a marketing plan for a field of their choice, focusing on product mix, new product development and concepts as well as consumer attitudes. Students will explore bringing products and services to market and where possible actually do so.

Number: BUS253
Credits: 3.00
Type: Business Administration
School: School of Information Technology

Management and issues related to this industry are examined. Emphasis is placed on the application of management principles. Realistic examples and case studies are utilized to examine various aspects of management. Students will work to examine decisions that were made in real examples and develop decisions in hypothetical ones.

Number: BUS255
Credits: 3.00
Type: Business Administration
School: School of Information Technology

Students will study various activities that are the responsibility of the front office. Focus will be on guestroom availability, reservation processing, guest registration, night audit, check-out procedures and the importance of technology and the Internet for optimum operation of the business. The impact this office has in conjunction with all other departments in the organization that are needed to operate a successful establishment are reviewed.

Number: BUS261
Credits: 3.00
Type: Business Administration
School: School of Information Technology

The elements of product, price, promotion and place are applied to the Hotel/Resort offerings. Students will examine a variety of popular hotels and resorts to understand who they appeal to and why. This course will require students to develop a marketing plan focusing on product mix, new product development and concepts as well as consumer likes and dislikes. The importance of diversity, pricing and consumer needs is examined.

Number: BUS263
Credits: 3.00
Type: Business Administration
School: School of Information Technology

The importance of store image, color and composition, types of displays and fixtures to the consumer. Displays, graphics, lighting and the logic behind floor plans are critical components to a course which allows students to learn and apply their creativity to a store design of their own.

Number: BUS271
Credits: 3.00
Type: Business Administration
School: School of Information Technology

The principles that govern the movement of merchandise, what sells and what doesn’t are covered in this course. Students will study successful and not so successful products as determined by consumer response, in conjunction with why they were so. Buying decisions, strategies, costs, product margins and profit/ loss statements are examined. Evaluation of business opportunities and risk management in conjunction with industry best practices are studied across a variety of well known stores.

Number: BUS273
Credits: 3.00
Type: Business Administration
School: School of Information Technology

Methods and techniques utilized in planning, organizing, promoting and delivering major events are explored. Students will first examine various aspects of the Business Venture of their choice covering issues ranging from setting objectives and goals, to communication and ultimately management and delivery of the plan. They will complete a term project which will be designed to develop an event either for the college or an external function taking full responsibility for its overall development, communications, forecasting sales, setting up operations, selling tickets and delivering their event to the consumer. Customer service satisfaction and issues will be addressed.

Number: BUS275
Credits: 3.00
Type: Business Administration
School: School of Information Technology

The way you handle yourself in a business and social environment can reveal a lot about you, and your position within an organization. From meetings with the boss to meetings with clients and customers, knowing the right things to do and say can make a tremendous difference in helping you reach your goals. Students will understand: Why etiquette is important, proper manners for meeting and greeting others, basic office equipment etiquette, professional presence (what to wear and not to wear), the basics of how to act in both business and social situations, dealing with customers so that objectives are achieved, careers expand and sales grow.

Number: BUS277
Credits: 3.00
Type: Business Administration
School: School of Information Technology

This course examines the fundamental financial problems of business. The student becomes acquainted with financial organization and operation. Current and long-term requirements for capital and analysis of capital structure including planning and control, budgeting and forecasting are examined.

Prerequisite: ACC107 or permission to waive

Number: BUS314
Credits: 3.00
Type: Business Administration

Course No.   Semester
Credits

Investigation and application of advanced database concepts will be covered including database administration, database technology, and selection and acquisition of database management systems. Through the introduction of Microsoft Access, the students will complete an in-depth practicum in database applications, including database design, relational tables, queries forms, and reports.

Prerequisite: GEN115 or NET111 or DMD101 or permission to waive.

Number: CIS233
Credits: 3.00
Type: Computer Information Systems

This course will examine Business Processes Analysis as a method of problem solving. Learners will monitor and evaluate the life of a system and its ability to continue to meet business requirements, and will design and implement modifications and enhancements in response to end-user requests and environmental changes.

Prerequisites: An earned Associate degree or demonstrated proficiency in writing and third semester standing and GEN115 or DMD101 or NET111.

Number: CIS310
Credits: 3.00
Type: Digital Media
School: School of Information Technology

Course No.   Semester
Credits
DMD101 Visual Storytelling » 3

This course is an introduction to digital media concepts and includes discussions of digital media design and development. The course will review current and emerging trends in digital media technologies, career opportunities, and resources. Students will be exposed to a variety of different media applications used in the industry, while learning the value of telling a story through studying design and storytelling in both principle and practice. Various media will be used to render stories from concept to completion, including photography, illustration, computer graphics, storyboarding, and collage.

Number: DMD101
Credits: 3.00
Type: Digital Media
School: School of Information Technology

This course combines concepts and practical skills in the field of illustration. Students will examine principles of design, contrast and color control, layer design and masks. Students will plan, execute and layout professional level projects using a full range of digital technology.

Number: DMD105
Credits: 3.00
Type: Digital Media
School: School of Information Technology

This course combines concepts and practical skills in the field of digital imaging. Students will explore photo manipulation techniques, color layout and design for web pages, interface design and printed media. Students will plan, execute and layout professional level projects using a full range of digital technology.

Number: DMD107
Credits: 3.00
Type: Digital Media
School: School of Information Technology

This course will cover digital video editing and basic digital sound editing. Graphic manipulation, masking, and sequencing will be covered. Special effects such as filters, transparency keys and tweening will also be covered. Students will storyboard, edit and develop project management skills through the production process.

Number: DMD113
Credits: 3.00
Type: Digital Media
School: School of Information Technology

This course focuses on basic modeling and animation techniques. Students will build on the skills that they have acquired from the prerequisite courses by using their knowledge to create 3D artwork. Students will learn fundamentals of modeling, animation, shading and rendering by manipulating vector objects through space and using lighting effects and surface textures. Students will work individually with current 3D modeling and animation software to create technically and artistically accomplished animations to add to their portfolio.
Prerequisite: DMD105 or DMD107 or permission to waive.

Number: DMD121
Credits: 3.00
Type: Digital Media
School: School of Information Technology

After Effects is the desktop standard for compositing and creating 2D/3D animation and stunning special effects for film, video, multimedia and the Web. Students will create motion graphics in a timeline environment and blend together video, still imagery, audio, text, and time based effects. Some of the topics to be discussed include digital compression, output formats, color correction and manipulation, title design, key framing, masks, layers and mattes.
Prerequisite: DMD105 or DMD107 or DMD113 or permission to waive.

Number: DMD123
Credits: 3.00
Type: Digital Media
School: School of Information Technology

This course will introduce the student to basic game theory, including game play and strategy. The historical development of the video game industry will be examined, as well as the overall processes involved in developing a video game through the study and development of analog games; including concept development, documentation and play-testing.
Prerequisite: DMD101 or permission to waive.

Number: DMD131
Credits: 3.00
Type: Digital Media
School: School of Information Technology

Having successfully completed the prerequisites, students will work towards applying their paper concept to the computer in producing a stand-alone game prototype that demonstrates the principles of game design acquired in preceding courses. Working as individuals and/or in groups, students will storyboard, create and manage game assets, and script the interactive elements in preparation to complete a basic working prototype.
Prerequisites: DMD131 and DMD165 and a departmental Algebra exam. Competency or permission to waive. May be taken concurrently with DMD165.

Number: DMD141
Credits: 3.00
Type: Digital Media
School: School of Information Technology

This course concentrates on graphic design process, research and concept development. Typography, layout, design quality, and construction for the commercial market will be covered. Topics include page layout, fundamentals of type, importing, creating graphics, fonts, color, styles, generating and placing text, and object linking and embedding.

Number: DMD150
Credits: 3.00
Type: Digital Media
School: School of Information Technology

This course will concentrate on both Dreamweaver and the hypertext markup language, HTML. Students will learn to incorporate images and format text in a desirable, aesthetic fashion. Students will also learn design concepts such as creating form elements, building lists and hot links, as well as building tables and frames. This course will stress the proper use of design techniques and tactics learned in prerequisite courses to formulate exciting, cohesive websites designed to be both user friendly and attractive.
Prerequisite: DMD105 or DMD107 or permission to waive.

Number: DMD160
Credits: 3.00
Type: Digital Media
School: School of Information Technology

Flash is the standard for interactive vector graphics and animation on the World Wide Web. Students will use Flash to create resizable and extremely compact, low bandwidth navigation interfaces and animations as well as other effects used in today’s web design.
Prerequisite: DMD105 or DMD107 or permission to waive.

Number: DMD165
Credits: 3.00
Type: Digital Media
School: School of Information Technology

This course is an introduction to the software engineering design process; which is to identify the problem, research the problem, develop possible solutions, select the best possible solution(s), code prototypes and/or models, test and evaluate, communicate the solutions, and redesign. Students will develop these basic skills through the use of a graphical programming language, allowing them to build a foundation and understanding of this process before moving on to the syntax and semantics of a particular high-end programming language in future courses. Developed at M.I.T., Scratch takes advantage of advances in computing power and interface design to make programming more engaging and accessible for those who are learning to program.

Number: DMD175
Credits: 3.00
Type: Digital Media
School: School of Information Technology

This course will expand on the 3-dimensional modeling and animation techniques covered in the prerequisite. Using ”Maya”, one of the most widely used software applications by professionals, students will also have the opportunity to further develop their skills with modeling, materials, textures, and lighting, while gaining an introduction to particle systems.
Prerequisite: DMD121 or permission to waive.

Number: DMD205
Credits: 3.00
Type: Digital Media
School: School of Information Technology

HTML5 is the newest major revision of the HTML web language standard, offering flexibility, ease-of-coding, and powerful new features. This course covers using HTML (Hypertext Markup Language) and JavaScript to produce powerful interactive Web content. JavaScript is an essential language for some of the features of HTML5, and students will learn the basic use of JavaScript, JQuery and the new HTML5 JavaScript APIs. This course may also touch on CSS3 (Cascading Style Sheets), which offers more sophisticated properties and elegant solutions for styling and animating elements.
Prerequisite: DMD175 or permission to waive

Number: DMD227
Credits: 3.00
Type: Digital Media
School: School of Information Technology

This course will build on the skills learned through the prerequisite while covering some of the advanced features of Dreamweaver. Topics will focus on defining behaviors, editing graphics in Fireworks, creating templates, developing libraries, defining and utilizing plug-ins and exploring the use of back-end databases.
Prerequisite: DMD160 or permission to waive.

Number: DMD230
Credits: 3.00
Type: Digital Media
School: School of Information Technology

As a continuation of the prerequisite, students will further learn development techniques and scripting concepts to enable successful completion of a stand-alone game prototype that was designed in preceding courses.
Prerequisite: DMD141 or permission to waive.

Number: DMD241
Credits: 3.00
Type: Digital Media
School: School of Information Technology)

This course will cover the basics of graphic design. The topics covered will include image and page composition, layout, text, and color theory. Projects will include ad design, corporate identity, newsletter/paper and magazine layout. Students should have taken Photoshop, Illustrator, and InDesign before taking this class.
Prerequisite: DMD105, DMD107, and DMD150 or permission to waive.

Number: DMD250
Credits: 3.00
Type: Digital Media
School: School of Information Technology

This course will focus on the design and development of a final digital media portfolio project. It will include coverage of project management skills, digital media design, development and delivery. Students will use their project management skills, interactive design concepts and workflow strategies to produce their final portfolio. Students will brainstorm, storyboard, outline, and collect created artwork for the development of their personal portfolio, which will demonstrate all of their acquired skills as well as quality, relevance and successful completion of their major.
Prerequisite: Approval of Department Chairperson.

Number: DMD265
Credits: 3.00
Type: Digital Media
School: School of Information Technology

The Associate Degree Program Internship is designed to give students hands-on-experience in a business environment and to assist students transitioning from college to the workplace. Emphasis will be placed on developing positive workplace habits, attitudes, and behaviors, which will enable associate level students to apply the knowledge and skills learned in the classroom and to meet employer expectations upon graduation.
Prerequisite: Prior approval by the Department Chairperson is required before registration.

Number: DMD301
Credits: 3.00
Type: Digital Media
School: School of Information Technology

The objective of this course is to familiarize students with digital technologies as they are being used in the workplace today, and explore how emerging technologies are likely to continue to evolve. Students will be exposed to digital technology fundamentals to better position them to readily adopt common workplace technologies. Students will also learn about security concerns, ethical considerations, digital communications etiquette, and other important concepts related to the use of digital technologies.

Number: GEN115
Credits: 3.00
Type: General Education

In this course, students develop their reading comprehension and written communication skills. Different styles of writing are examined as students develop writing proficiency through practice in planning, outlining and editing. In addition to regular class meeting times, students are required to participate in a ten week Writing Lab component which counts as ten percent of the grade for English Composition. For the Day College, the Writing Lab is graded as a Pass or Fail.
Prerequisite: Proficiency Examination and/or ACE108.

Number: GEN125
Credits: 3.00
Type: General Education
School: School of Information Technology

This course builds on skills developed in English Composition I by presenting additional writing styles and helping students further refine their writing skills. Research skills and MLA documentation are also introduced. In addition to regular class meeting times, students are required to participate in a ten week Writing Lab component which counts as ten percent of the grade for English Composition. For the Day College, the Writing Lab is graded as a Pass or Fail.
Note: Writing Lab is not required in the adult division or for fully online programs.
Prerequisite: GEN125 or permission to waive

Number: GEN127
Credits: 3.00
Type: General Education
School: School of Information Technology

This course is intended to sharpen a student’s ability to think clearly, consistently, critically and creatively. The course considers principles of sound judgment, both deductive and inductive, separating fact from opinion; analyzing arguments and testing hypotheses.

Number: GEN131
Credits: 3.00
Type: General Education
School: School of Business (Online)

This course is designed to develop the literacy required to deal with technology and science-related issues in today’s society. Basic concepts underlying matter, energy, and life are examined, and students develop analytical, reasoning, and problem-solving skills needed to address these topics.

Number: GEN145
Credits: 3.00
Type: General Education
School: School of Information Technology

This course will provide complimentary sessions to Basics of Math in fundamental mathematics. A thorough review of ratios, percentages, proportions, descriptive statistics, word problems, and an introduction to algebra will be covered. The course provides a sound understanding in basic math concepts that is necessary for future math courses.
Prerequisite: Proficiency exam and/or ACE106.

Number: GEN147
Credits: 3.00
Type: General Education
School: School of Information Technology

This course offers an introduction to basic statistical theory and application. Topics to be discussed in detail include: sampling procedures; finding mean, median and mode; finding the variance and standard deviation; graphing histograms and bell curves. This course also illustrates how statistics are used in the business world as well as in the media and the benefits and drawbacks of statistical information.
Prerequisite: Proficiency exam and/or ACE106 or permission to waive.

Number: GEN157
Credits: 3.00
Type: General Education
School: School of Information Technology

This course takes a realistic approach based on the principles of general psychology and is designed to assist the student in coping with life situations. Included are theories of personality, emotions, character, motivation, environmental influences and the development of students.

Number: GEN161
Credits: 3.00
Type: General Education
School: School of Information Technology

Global issues such as world hunger, human rights and nuclear war, as well as American issues concerning inequalities of wealth, civil rights, crime and the role of government are examined in this course. In addition to gaining an understanding of the social, political and economic dimensions of these issues, students will also consider the underlying values and ethics.

Number: GEN167
Credits: 3.00
Type: General Education
School: School of Information Technology

A study of the institutions of American government and the forces that shape governmental action, with emphasis on the role of the presidency, the Congress, federal/state relations and the two party system. Special consideration is given to the growing concentration of power in American society, in public as well as private sectors.

Number: GEN171
Credits: 3.00
Type: General Education
School: School of Information Technology

This course is an in-depth examination of national and international governments and politics. The course emphasizes the comparative study of political institutions, ideologies, political cultures, participation, and party systems in the United States and selected nations of the world. Patterns of political change and global interactions with reference to current issues will be studied.

Number: GEN179
Credits: 3.00
Type: General Education
School: School of Information Technology

The basic principles of microeconomics; individual and social choice, specialization and trade, supply and demand and prices are discussed. The study of scarcity and choice and marginal concepts are examined and an understanding of command and market economics, private property and factors of production is provided.

Number: GEN181
Credits: 3.00
Type: General Education
School: School of Information Technology

This course covers the basic principles of macroeconomics: money, spending, output and income. Examined are the circular flow of income and spending, money and the banking systems, including the Gross National Product and various price indexes. The problems of unemployment, inflation and the national debt are examined.

Number: GEN183
Credits: 3.00
Type: General Education
School: School of Information Technology

In this course students will explore the rich history of modern design and its continuing influence on design practices. Topics will include the history of type, graphic design, video and interactivity. A survey of topics, movements and disciplines that relate to modern design, the way we perceive the world today and how one can learn from the past, while pushing design into the future, will be examined.

Number: GEN191
Credits: 3.00
Type: General Education
School: School of Information Technology

This is a studio class covering design in principle and practice. Students will learn-by-doing; developing artistic skills needed for success in today’s computer age. Various media will be used to render still life, emulations, and the human figure. The use of perspective, proportion, shading, highlighting, and color will be examined and developed through studio work.

Number: GEN193
Credits: 3.00
Type: General Education
School: School of Information Technology

This course will examine the principles of color theory and design. Students will gain an understanding of color relationships, as well as learn to identify and analyze the principles and elements of design. Emphasis is placed on color relationships, visual impact, as well as the psychological and symbolic uses of color. Students will utilize these theories and principles in the creation of their own unique designs through creative hands-on projects. In addition, students will also develop their comprehension of 3D space, light, materials and texture. Students will discover the power and effect of color, two-dimensional design, and three-dimensional design on an audience.

Number: GEN195
Credits: 3.00
Type: General Education
School: School of Information Technology

This course examines the human dynamics in organizations, focusing on individuals and small groups within them. Students will learn a wide range of interpersonal skills needed to succeed in most business occupations. In addition, students will learn how to identify group goals, understand the different needs of group members, accomplish group tasks and effectively communicate within groups.

Number: GEN241
Credits: 3.00
Type: General Education
School: School of Information Technology

This course will introduce the student to the moral principles and standards that guide behavior in today’s complex society and business. The definition and application of moral philosophies are used to explore ethical decision-making using a case study approach. Economic, legal and social dimensions are explored along with interpersonal relationships and the development of morality within individual thinking.

Number: GEN250
Credits: 3.00
Type: General Education

This course is a survey of research methods focusing on the fundamentals of research design, including data collection and data analysis. Topics include scientific writing using APA style, evaluation of research literature, and ethical issues in research. Practice is provided in asking research questions, formulating research hypotheses, designing and conducting a simulated research study, and presenting results.
Prerequisites: Sophomore Status, and Cumulative GPA of 3.25 or higher, and GEN157 Statistics OR Permission of Chairperson of student’s program.

Number: GEN290
Credits: 3.00
Type: General Education
School: School of Information Technology

This transition course serves to provide students with an overview of the fundamental strategies used in contemporary business settings to communicate in the digital age. The course will provide to students at the junior level, who have not had the benefit of associate degree-level digital media courses, to proceed in upper level baccalaureate courses in the Interactive Digital Media and Marketing program.
Prerequisite: Junior Level Status or Permission of the Department Chairperson.

Number: GEN300
Credits: 3.00
Type: General Education

The Associate Degree Program Internship is designed to give students hands-on-experience in a business environment and to assist students transitioning from college to the workplace. Emphasis will be placed on developing positive workplace habits, attitudes, and behaviors, which will enable associate level students to apply the knowledge and skills learned in the classroom and to meet employer expectations upon graduation. Prerequisite: Prior approval by the Department Chairperson is required before registration.

Number: GEN301
Credits: 3.00
Type: General Education
School: School of Information Technology

Students will be introduced to the foundation of medical terminology through a thorough study of the roots, prefixes, and suffixes which form medical language. Students will also learn the vocabulary used in various medical specialties. Spelling, definitions, and pronunciation are stressed.

Students must receive a minimum grade of a C (70%) to continue. Students may receive a grade of D (60-69%) but will be required to repeat the course.

Number: MED103
Credits: 3.00
Type: General Education

This course will introduce for discussion a variety of ethical issues that healthcare professionals may encounter during the course of their careers. Emphasis will be placed on the importance of ethical and professional behavior in the healthcare workplace. In depth discussions, textbook assignments and role playing will provide guidance to students in how to successfully manage patient relationships, protect patient privacy in compliance with the Health Insurance Privacy and Accountability Act as well as understand the distinct job responsibilities of the myriad of employees who comprise the typical health-care organization.

Students must receive a minimum grade of a C (70%) to continue. Students may receive a grade of D (60-69%) but will be required to repeat the course.

Number: MED111
Credits: 3.00
Type: Allied Health

Course No.   Semester
Credits
NET108 Computer Forensics » 3

The expansion of the Internet and the increased use of computers have amplified the risk of technology being used to commit crimes and/or crimes being recorded on electronic devices. Because of this, a skilled computer forensics expert is needed to investigate criminal and civil cases. This course is an introduction to computer forensics. Digital media, past and current operating systems, and computer hardware will be examined. Forensics software tools will be used to identify, collect, examine and preserve evidence/information which is magnetically stored or encoded on computer devices.

Number: NET108
Credits: 3.00
Type: Network Administration
School: School of Information Technology

This course is designed to help students gain the skills and knowledge in general security concepts, communication security, infrastructure security, basics of cryptography and operational/organizational security. This course is designed to help students prepare for the CompTIA “Security+” certification exam.
Prerequisite: NET125 or permission to waive

Number: NET283
Credits: 3.00
Type: Network Administration
School: School of Information Technology

The Associate Degree Program Internship is designed to give students hands-on experience in a business environment and to assist students transitioning from college to the workplace. Emphasis will be placed on developing positive workplace habits, attitudes, and behaviors, which will enable associate level students to apply the knowledge and skills learned in the classroom and to meet employer expectations upon graduation.
Prerequisites: NET151 and prior approval by the Department Chairperson is required before registration.

Number: NET305
Credits: 3.00
Type: Network Administration
School: School of Information Technology

In this course, students will examine the concepts and applications of Microsoft Word & PowerPoint. Students will use the technology tools to create business documents, marketing materials, and develop effective business presentations which will prepare students for today’s information based business environment.
Prerequisite: OFT115 or DMD101, or NET111 or permission to waive

Number: OFT122
Credits: 3.00
Type: Office Technology

This course introduces Excel spreadsheet concepts using software in the Windows environment. Topics to be covered include: creating the Excel worksheet, formulas, functions, enhancing spreadsheets with graphs and charts, analyzing spreadsheet data (what–if analysis) and working with large worksheets.

Number: OFT127
Credits: 3.00
Type: Office Technology

48 CREDITS REQUIRED FOR GRADUATION


Certificate Computer Networking Specialist Federal Program Disclosure Information - Day Division
Certificate Computer Networking Specialist Federal Program Disclosure Information - Adult Division