Information Technology


A Bachelor of Science in Information Technology degree from The College Of Westchester advances your knowledge in data science technologies and cloud computing systems. This BS program emphasizes big data, systems architecture, information infrastructure, and cyber security.

Bachelor of Science (BS) – HEGIS Code 0701

The Bachelor of Science in Information Technology program provides a solid foundation of IT skills and knowledge, communication skills, critical thinking and design skills relevant to succeed in an IT career. Students will learn the core competencies needed to plan strategic and effective IT solutions for any organization.



    Graduates of the Bachelor of Science program should be able to:
  • Design, secure, operate, and troubleshoot enterprise networks and equipment such as switches and routers.
  • Utilize critical thinking and problem-solving skills using real and virtual equipment to build personal computers, establish virtualization, software-defined networks, and use application programming interfaces (APIs) and configuration management tools to enable network automation.
  • Use IT tools to design, develop, and implement effective IT solutions and to solve organizational problems.
  • Investigate and analyze security vulnerabilities and mitigate threats by applying effective countermeasures.
  • Using the software development process and algorithmic approaches, design, write, test, and run web and desktop applications using object-oriented programming languages.


Course No.   Semester
Credits

This course is designed to provide students with the knowledge and troubleshooting skills needed to provide capable hardware support of personal computers. Students will identify proper procedures for installing and configuring system components and devices; diagnose and troubleshoot system problems; identify safety procedures; identify motherboards, types of memory, bus architectures and CMOS; define the print process and identify procedures for servicing printers; identify the components of portable systems; define networks. This course aligns to one of two CompTIA A+ exams.

Number: NET111
Credits:
3.00
Type: Network Administration

This course is designed to provide students with the knowledge and troubleshooting skills needed to provide capable software support of personal computers. Students will learn the basic system administration knowledge of command line prompt and Windows operating systems for installing, configuring, upgrading, troubleshooting, and repairing desktop computer systems. This course aligns to one of two CompTIA A+ exams.

Prerequisite: NET111 or permission of Chair

Number: NET117
Credits: 3.00
Type: Network Administration

This course provides students with a basic understanding of the way networks operate. Student will learn about network components and their functions, as well as how a network is structured, and the architectures used to create networks, including the internet. Student will be able to build local area networks (LANs), configure basic settings on routers and switches, and implement internet protocol (IP). This is the first course of a three course Cisco Academy program that aligns to the CCNA certification exam.

Prerequisite: NET111 or permission of Chair

Number: NET125
Credits: 3.00
Type: Network Administration

This course presents an overview of various Linux operating systems used by information technology (IT) professionals. Students will install, configure, and troubleshoot the Linux operating system, both on-premises and cloud-based server environments. Security best practices, scripting, containerization, and automation will also be covered. This course aligns to the CompTIA Linux certification exam.

Prerequisite: NET125 or permission to waive

Number: NET145
Credits: 3.00
Type: Network Administration

This course presents an overview of the Windows operating system used as a server in a client/server network. Students will install, configure, and troubleshoot a Windows server; examine the file systems; plan, implement and administer Active Directory Services; administer print services; examine network protocols and services; monitor and optimize system resources.

Prerequisite: NET117 or permission of Chair

Number: NET151
Credits: 3.00
Type: Network Administration

This course is a continuation of the Cisco Academy Program.
This course advances one’s knowledge of the operation of routers and switches in small-to-medium business networks and includes wireless local area networks (WLANs) and security concepts. Students learn key switching and routing concepts. They can perform basic network configuration and troubleshooting, identify and mitigate LAN security threats, and configure and secure a basic WLAN. This is the second of a three course Cisco Academy program that aligns to the CCNA certification exam.

Prerequisite: NET125

Number: NET163
Credits: 3.00
Type: Network Administration

THIS COURSE IS FOR DAY DIVISION STUDENTS ONLY
The Internship is a capstone course involving the culmination project in the Information Technology program. It will provide students an opportunity to demonstrate they have achieved the goals for learning established within the program. The Internship course integrates coursework, knowledge, skills, and practical learning to enable the student to demonstrate a broad mastery of learning across the curriculum for future employability and further career advancement.

Prerequisites: Completion of 42 of the 54 credits required in the IT program and a minimum GPA of 2.0. The Internship course must be taken in the final semester of a student’s IT program.

Prerequisite: NET125

Number: NET215
Credits: 3.00
Type: Network Administration

This course describes the architectures and considerations related to designing, securing, operating, and troubleshooting enterprise networks. This course covers wide area network (WAN) technologies and quality of service (QoS) mechanisms used for secure remote access. ENSA also introduces software-defined networking, virtualization, and automation concepts that support the digitalization of networks. Students gain skills to configure and troubleshoot enterprise networks and learn to identify and protect against cybersecurity threats. They are introduced to network management tools and learn key concepts of software-defined networking, including controller-based architectures and how application programming interfaces (APIs) enable network automation. This is the third course of a three-course Cisco Academy program that aligns to the CCNA certification exam.

Prerequisite: NET163

Number: NET265
Credits: 3.00
Type: Network Administration

This course is designed to help students gain the skills and knowledge in general security concepts, communication security, infrastructure security, basics of cryptography and operational/organizational security. This course is aligned to the CompTIA “Security+” certification exam.

Prerequisite: NET125 or permission of Chair

Number: NET283
Credits: 3.00
Type: Network Administration

This course is designed to give students the skills needed to analyze business requirements and design a directory and network services architecture using the Windows operating system. Students will understand how to make directory services work for an organization as well as plan, implement, and manage directory services. Students will analyze the existing and planned organizational structures; evaluate the company’s existing and planned technical environment; design a directory and network infrastructure.

Prerequisite: NET151

Number: NET335
Credits: 3.00
Type: Network Administration

This course provides the fundamental networking skills required to deploy and support Windows Server in most organizations. It covers IP fundamentals, remote access technologies, and more advanced content including Software Defined Networking. In addition, this course provides a thorough guide of various models for cloud computing implementation and offers exam objectives for the CompTIA Cloud Essentials exam.

Prerequisite: NET151

Number: NET345
Credits: 3.00
Type: Network Administration

This course is a comprehensive review of the tasks, knowledge, skill, and ability (KSA) requirements of the National Initiative for Cybersecurity Education (NICE) workforce framework and its relationship to the National Institute of Standards and Technology Cybersecurity Framework (NIST CSF). This course explores the principles and models needed to ensure a sound cybersecurity framework is established in the workforce.
In addition, the Cisco CyberOps Associate curriculum will be used in this course. This curriculum provides an introduction to the knowledge and skills needed for a Security Analyst working with a Security Operations Center team. It teaches core security skills needed for monitoring, detecting, investigating, and responding to security events, thus protecting systems and organizations from cybersecurity risks, threats, and vulnerabilities.

Prerequisite: NET283

Number: NET410
Credits: 3.00
Type: Network Administration

THIS COURSE IS FOR DAY DIVISION STUDENTS ONLY.

The Internship is a capstone course involving the culmination project in the Information Technology program. It will provide students an opportunity to demonstrate they have achieved the goals for learning established within the program. The Internship course integrates coursework, knowledge, skills, and practical learning to enable the student to demonstrate a broad mastery of learning across the curriculum for future employability and further career advancement.


Prerequisite: The internship course must be taken in the final two semesters of a student’s degree program.

Number: NET470
Credits: 3.00
Type: Network Administration

THIS COURSE IS FOR DAY DIVISION STUDENTS ONLY.

This course introduces the art and science of planning and writing programs and enforces good style and logical thinking. Students will learn the guidelines to developing structured program logic and compose a set of instructions that directs a computers’ behavior.

Number:CIS110
Credits: 3.00
Type: Network Administration

This course uses advanced problem-solving strategies and algorithms using classes and objects. Students will develop programs using data structures, character strings, records, files, stacks and queues.

Prerequisite: CIS110

Number:CI2110
Credits: 3.00
Type: Network Administration

Investigation and application of advanced database concepts will be covered including database administration, database technology, and selection and acquisition of database management systems. Through the introduction of Microsoft Access, the students will complete an in-depth practicum in database applications, including database design, relational tables, queries, forms, and reports.

Prerequisite: GEN115 or NET111 or DMD101 or permission of Chair

Number:CIS233
Credits: 3.00
Type: Network Administration

This course introduces Python programming concepts and techniques. Students will learn how to write and test code, handle common errors, and develop interactive programs using the Python language.

Prerequisite: CIS110

Number:CIS325
Credits: 3.00
Type: Network Administration

This course introduces the advanced features of the SQL language and how it can be used to query a database in order to answer business questions. Students will examine the following advanced features: querying with unions, advanced joins and sub queries, add, update and remove data, manipulate tables, views and various indexes, data integrity with transactions, and creation of databases.

Prerequisite: CIS233

Number:CIS420
Credits: 3.00
Type: Network Administration

  Total Major-Related Credits 54
     
  *Note: Evening Division students taking their BBA Internship will take this over two terms. This course is broken into two courses as listed below:  

THIS COURSE IS FOR EVENING DIVISION STUDENTS ONLY
This course is a non-credit workshop which occurs in the term prior to the BS in IT Internship assignment. The purpose of this workshop is to complete the internship site selection process, which may entail a formal interview with the prospective site supervisor. Students must complete this workshop in order to enroll in the NET470B – BS in IT Internship.

Prerequisites: The workshop must be taken in the final five terms of a student’s degree program and must be completed prior to a student’s enrollment in NET470B.

Number: NET470A
Type: Network Administration

THIS COURSE IS FOR EVENING DIVISION STUDENTS ONLY
This course is a continuation of NET470A. The Internship is the capstone course for the BS in IT degree. Students will be placed in a workplace setting where they will have the opportunity to apply their skills and knowledge to typical tasks they may encounter in actual employment. They will be expected to report to their worksites as if they were employees and will be subject to supervision, coaching, performance feedback, and responsibility for assignments appropriate to their preparation and employee work level. Work schedules will be combined with class meetings. These meetings will be jointly conducted by professors from Career Development Services and the General Education department. The purpose of these classes is to reflect upon Internship experiences and assignments, review and discuss journal entries, organize thoughts, ideas, and materials for the internship paper, receive and offer support to fellow internship students, gain greater self-awareness of one’s preparation and readiness for work using the project management skill set.

Prerequisite: NET470A The Internship course must be taken in the final four terms of a student’s degree program.

Number: NET470B
Type: Network Administration

Course No.   Semester
Credits

This course will introduce students to the value of change, personal growth, and transformation. Students will engage in activities designed to stimulate reflective thinking, create a positive personal outlook, and foster “behaviors of success.”

Number: GEN105
Credits: 3.00
Type: General Education

In this course, students develop their reading comprehension and written communication skills. Different styles of writing are examined as students develop writing proficiency through practice in planning, outlining, drafting, revising and editing. In addition to regular class meeting times, Day Division students are required to participate in a ten-week Writing Lab component which counts as ten percent of the grade for English Composition. For the Day Division, the Writing Lab is graded as Pass or Fail.
Note: Writing Lab is not required in the Evening division or for fully online programs.
Prerequisite: Proficiency Examination and/or ACE108

Number: GEN125
Credits: 3.00
Type: General Education

This course builds on skills developed in English Composition I by presenting additional writing styles and helping students further refine their writing skills. Research skills and MLA documentation are also introduced. In addition to regular class meeting times, Day Division students are required to participate in a ten-week Writing Lab component which counts as ten percent of the grade for English Composition. For the Day Division, the Writing Lab is graded as Pass or Fail.

Note: Writing Lab is not required in the Evening division or for fully online programs.

Prerequisite: GEN125 or permission of Chair

Number: GEN127
Credits: 3.00
Type: General Education

Communication skills require good speech habits. Therefore, this course covers organization of thoughts, voice control, diction, and presentation of ideas to a variety of audiences. The art of listening is also studied. Emphasis will be placed on a series of oral presentations in order to acquire and reinforce these skills.

Number: GEN129
Credits: 3.00
Type: General Education

Topics include the fundamentals of algebra: the rules of numbers, equations, negative numbers and integers, fractions and rational numbers, exponents, inequalities, graphs, and linear equations. Emphasis will be placed on word problems and business applications.

Prerequisite: Proficiency exam and/or ACE106 or permission of Chair

Number: GEN151
Credits: 3.00
Type: General Education

This course offers an introduction to basic statistical theory and application. Topics to be discussed in detail include: sampling procedures, finding mean, median, and mode; finding the variance and standard deviation; graphing histograms and bell curves. This course also illustrates how statistics are used in the business world as well as in the media and the benefits and drawbacks of statistical information.

Prerequisite: Proficiency exam and/or ACE106 or permission of Chair

Number: GEN157
Credits: 3.00
Type: General Education

This course is designed to provide a culminating experience in business communications and professional development. Covered in this course are advanced English usage essential to written business document creation and oral presentations. Using individual participation and demonstration methods, students will be trained in interviewing techniques and in developing professional demeanors vital to career success.

Prerequisite: GEN127 or permission of Chair.

Number: GEN224
Credits: 3.00
Type: General Education

This course will introduce the student to the moral principles and standards that guide behavior in today’s complex society and business. The definition and application of moral philosophies are used to explore ethical decision-making using a case study approach. Economic, legal, and social dimensions are explored along with interpersonal relationships and the development of morality within individual thinking.

Number: GEN250
Credits: 3.00
Type: General Education

This course builds upon the introductory GEN157 Statistics course and offers an introduction to additional statistical concepts and applications. Topics to be discussed in detail include: correlation and regression, sampling distributions and the central limit theorem, estimation using confidence intervals, and hypothesis testing. This course also illustrates how statistics are used in the business world as well as in the media, and the benefits and drawbacks of statistical information.

Prerequisite: GEN157

Number: GEN305
Credits: 3.00
Type: General Education

This course studies the unique mathematical structures of computer science and programming known as discrete mathematics. A wide range of topics such as permutations, properties of sets, formal logic notation, methods of performing proofs, recurrences, and discrete probability.

Prerequisite: Proficiency exam and/or GEN151

Number: GEN315
Credits: 3.00
Type: General Education

This course focuses on the adult years as a complex and extraordinarily variable process, rather than as an orderly sequence of predictable stages. Through experiential, interactive processes, this course will explore various theories and philosophies of adult physical, cognitive, and personality development. Attention will also be given to the larger social contexts and the adult’s experience as worker and learner.

Prerequisite: Sophomore Level Status or Permission of Chair.

Number: GEN330
Credits: 3.00
Type: General Education

This writing seminar is designed for bachelor degree students. Its focus will be on the importance of analysis and interpretation in the business and professional writing process. Students will learn how to write thoughtful, expressive, and well-developed documents for colleagues or management.

Prerequisite: Junior Level Status or Permission of Chair.

Number: GEN342
Credits: 3.00
Type: General Education

This course will examine how communication can be used to effectively resolve conflicts between people, organizations, and cultures. Conflicts resulting from differences in gender and ethnicity in the contexts of work and personal relationships will also be emphasized. The course will have an interdisciplinary emphasis through the use of cases from history, psychology, sociology, and current events.

Prerequisite: Junior Level Status or Permission of Chair.

Number: GEN363
Credits: 3.00
Type: General Education

This course will emphasize the necessary written, oral, and visual communication needed for today’s global business environment. The course is designed to provide a basic understanding of the importance of professionalism in the workplace, especially in the competitive business environment. Both interpersonal skills as well as research skills will be developed throughout the course. Throughout the semester, students will learn how utilizing creative skills and being flexible will be valuable in many career scenarios.

Prerequisites: GEN342 or BUS324, and Junior Level Status, or Permission of Chair.

Number: GEN421
Credits: 3.00
Type: General Education

  Total General Education Credits 42
 
  Electives
  General Education Electives (6) 18
  Total Elective Credits 24
 
  Electives
  Electives (2) 6

120 CREDITS REQUIRED FOR GRADUATION