Business Administration -
Concentration In Digital Marketing & Design

Launch your career with a degree in Business Administration with a Concentration in Digital Marketing & Design.

The Bachelor of Business Administration (BBA) Degree - Concentration in Digital Marketing & Design- offers students a strong and contemporary business program by integrating courses in management, marketing, social media for marketing & advertising, interface design principles, project management and publishing for the web. Students will learn practical business skills such as problem solving, decision making, team building and strategic planning. The Concentration in Digital Marketing & Design curriculum is well-defined and designed to help prepare students to become employable as creative and adaptable media specialists, an important combination in the current social media environment. BBA students will also focus and develop their newly acquired skills and knowledge during a required Internship.

 

 

"As an experienced educator who shares a background in banking, real estate, and law, I am convinced that both my knowledge and experience are valuable in a business learning environment. Any time an individual chooses to advance his/her education, the benefits of doing so are immeasurable. His interest in continuing to learn serves to secure his future while, simultaneously, improving that of his family, the community in which he lives, as well as all of society. Becoming a lifelong learner is the key to staying ahead of the learning curve while also strengthening one's ability to contribute as a leader in a rapidly changing world. It is my firm belief that any student who makes a serious commitment to his education is making a lifetime investment working toward a goal which will always hold him in good stead."

business administration with a concentration in marketing, bba digital marketing, bachelors digital marketing Dr. James McGee
Chairperson and Professor, Business Administration

    Graduates of the Bachelor’s Business Administration program should be able to:
  • Synthesize critical thinking and analysis skills to solve business problems in a real-world context.
  • Explain the impact of business decisions utilizing project management, research, planning and analytical skills.
  • Design a well-orchestrated, cohesive business presentation using oral and written communication skills.
  • Apply fundamental management, leadership and decision-making skills.
  • Prepare a comprehensive business plan.
  • Discuss the basic functions of business: economics, finance, management and marketing.


Course No.   Semester
Credits
ACC320 Accounting for Managers » 3

This course provides exposure to topics which include standard cost systems, budgeting, cost volume profit relationships and breakeven analysis. Spreadsheet and quantitative methods are utilized in class to analyze simulated real life business situations applied to modern manufacturing plants and other types of business enterprises.

Prerequisite: ACC107 or permission to waive

Number: ACC320
Credits: 3.00
Type: Accounting

This course will introduce the student to the concepts and skills needed in planning, organizing, operating and controlling a business firm’s total marketing program. Emphasis is placed on considerations necessary for sound marketing management decisions in product development, pricing, demand creation and channel activities of the firm. A global perspective will be introduced to provide an understanding of the effects and opportunities of an interconnected, international marketplace. Experiential exercises and case studies are employed to provide students with the opportunity to develop skills in the evaluation, diagnosis and formulation of marketing strategies and tactics.

Prerequisites: Junior level status and BUS112

Number: BUS305
Credits: 3.00
Type: Business Administration

A thorough study of the most modern management methods. Analyzes the areas of organizing, planning, staffing, directing and controlling the organization. Examines the relationship of individuals in line and staff positions and the nature and interaction of the activities.

Prerequisite: BUS103 or MED111 or permission to waive
Prerequisite: BUS103 or MED111 or permission to waive. Accounting majors (Associate and/or BBA degree students) are exempt from the prerequisite BUS103 Intro to Business Ventures

Number: BUS203
Credits: 3.00
Type: Business Administration

This course provides a survey of the areas of personal financial matters. The course content guides each person towards receiving results in the following areas: financial planning; buying on credit; borrowing money; using bank services; selecting from various types of insurance coverages; home ownerships vs renting; obtaining investment information; investing in stocks and bonds; budgeting; retirement planning and estate planning.

Number: BUS245
Credits: 3.00
Type: Business Administration

The emphasis of this course is on the core competencies of Project Management as defined by PMI (Project Management Institute) and set forth in the Guide to the Project Management Body of Knowledge (PMBOK). Upon introducing the foundational elements of project management, students will gain experience by applying these elements to projects and employing them during the course of a logical project life cycle.

Note: Recommended that this course be taken during 3rd Semester simultaneously with BUS440

Prerequisites: Junior level status

Number: BUS370
Credits: 3.00
Type: Business Administration

This seminar course covers the strategic analysis of major newsworthy events affecting the national and global business environment. The goal of this course is to enable students to develop an awareness of how valuable being “in the know” about current events is integral to business performance and employee productivity. Student participation includes the selection, strategic analysis, and discussion of a current major topic. Relevant and reputable business periodicals and journals will be examined. Students will conduct research and engage in discussion about important current issues that affect business.

Note: Recommended to take during 4th Semester, but not before 3rd Semester

Prerequisite: Junior Level Status

Number: BUS410
Credits: 3.00
Type: Business Administration

This course will reinforce the concepts learned in Introduction to Project Management and apply those lessons by using a project case study and Microsoft Project 2007. Students will learn how to create and maintain a project schedule and apply the principles of project management throughout the course in sample projects from the text and in a case study that each student will use to create his/her own project schedule using Microsoft Project.

Note: Recommended to take during 3rd Semester simultaneously with BUS370

Prerequisites: Junior level status and BUS370

Number: BUS440
Credits: 3.00
Type: Business Administration

THIS COURSE IS FOR DAY DIVISION STUDENTS ONLY

The Internship is a capstone course involving the culmination project in the Business Administration BBA program. It will provide students an opportunity to demonstrate they have achieved the goals for learning established within the program. The Internship course integrates coursework, knowledge, skills, and practical learning to enable the student to demonstrate a broad mastery of learning across the curriculum for future employability and further career advancement.

Prerequisites: BUS370, BUS440 and a minimum GPA of 2.0. The Internship course must be taken in the final semester of a student’s BBA program.

Number: BUS470
Credits: 3.00
Type: Business Administration

  Total Business/Accounting Credits 24
     
  *Adult Division students taking their BBA internship will take this over two terms. This course is broken into two courses as listed below:  

THIS COURSE IS FOR ADULT DIVISION STUDENTS ONLY

This course is a non-credit workshop which occurs in the term prior to the BBA Internship assignment. The purpose of this workshop is to complete the internship site selection process, which may entail a formal interview with the prospective site supervisor. Students must complete this workshop in order to enroll in the BUS470B - BBA Internship

Prerequisites: Junior status and enrollment in penultimate term of BBA program.

Number: BUS470A
Credits: 0.00
Type: Business Administration

THIS COURSE IS FOR DAY DIVISION STUDENTS ONLY

The Internship is a capstone course involving the culmination project in the Business Administration BBA program. It will provide students an opportunity to demonstrate they have achieved the goals for learning established within the program. The Internship course integrates coursework, knowledge, skills, and practical learning to enable the student to demonstrate a broad mastery of learning across the curriculum for future employability and further career advancement.

Prerequisites: BUS370, BUS440 and a minimum GPA of 2.0. The Internship course must be taken in the final semester of a student’s BBA program.

Number: BUS470B
Credits: 3.00
Type: Business Administration

Course No.   Semester
Credits
DMD300 Typography Essentials » 3

Typography is an essential aspect of all digital media fields including, but not limited to graphic design, animation, and game design. This course combines concepts and practical skills in the field of design. Students will explore typographic structures, terminology and various methods for using type as a tool for visual communication. Grid-based design and the fundamentals of layout will be examined through hands-on projects. Students will plan, execute and layout professional level projects using a full range of both digital technology and traditional media.

Prerequisites: Junior level standing and for non DM majors, approval from DM Department Chairperson.

Number: DMD300
Credits: 3.00
Type: Elective

The course will cover user interface design principles, task and user analysis, interface design methods, user interface evaluation and usability testing. The course offers strategies to design which bridge the gap between functionality and usability and introduces students to some of the unique challenges of designing within the realm of a digital, interactive medium. The course examines ways in which the features and functions of a product get translated into something people find usable, useful, and desirable.

Prerequisites: Junior level standing and for non DM majors, approval from DM Department Chairperson.

Number: DMD310
Credits: 3.00
Type: Elective

This course will explore the various facets of social media and its uses in the current digital landscape. Students will explore and analyze various social media tools and platforms and examine why and when each should be used. Students will apply various social techniques to real world cases to begin, or continue building, a social media portfolio. As a class, students will engage in discussions about the current social landscape and the place social media has in online communications, marketing and advertising, and personal branding. Students will acquire or expand upon the essential knowledge for a foundation in social media management, strategy and content creation.

Prerequisite: Junior level standing and for non DM majors, approval from DM Department Chairperson.

Number: DMD320
Credits: 3.00
Type: Elective

Students will examine the production, design and theory of online magazines, documents, Wikis and blogging. Student will use WordPress to develop an online magazine or blog of their own concept and philosophy. These sites will include research, advertising, copy and photographs all compiled by the students.

Prerequisites: DMD300 and DMD310

Number: DMD330
Credits: 3.00
Type: Digital Media

  Total Digital Media Credits 12

This course offers an introduction to basic statistical theory and application. Topics to be discussed in detail include: sampling procedures; finding mean, median and mode; finding the variance and standard deviation; graphing histograms and bell curves. This course also illustrates how statistics are used in the business world as well as in the media and the benefits and drawbacks of statistical information.

Prerequisite: Proficiency exam and/or ACE106 or permission to waive.

Number: GEN157
Credits: 3.00
Type: General Education

This course focuses on the adult years as a complex and extraordinarily variable process, rather than as an orderly sequence of predictable stages. Through experiential, interactive processes, this course will explore various theories and philosophies of adult physical, cognitive, and personality development. Attention will also be given to the larger social contexts and the adult’s experience as worker and learner.

Prerequisite: Sophmore Level Status or Permission of the Department Chairperson.

Number: GEN330
Credits: 3.00
Type: General Education

This writing seminar is designed for BBA majors. Its focus will be on the importance of analysis and interpretation in business and professional writing process. Business students will learn how to write thoughtful, expressive and welldeveloped documents for colleagues or management.

Prerequisite: Junior Level Status or Permission of the Department Chairperson.

Number: GEN342
Credits: 3.00
Type: General Education
Program: Accounting BBA
Business Administration BBA
School: School of Business

This course will examine how communication can be used to effectively resolve conflicts between people, organizations and cultures. Conflicts resulting from differences in gender and ethnicity in the contexts of work and personal relationships will also be emphasized. The course will have an interdisciplinary emphasis through the use of cases from history, psychology, sociology, and current events.

Prerequisite: Junior Level Status or Permission of the Department Chairperson.

Number: GEN363
Credits: 3.00
Type: General Education

Students will learn how to translate ideas into clear and concise business communications. Coursework will highlight the importance of analyzing writing purpose and selecting the appropriate stance, vocabulary, style, and format. Tone and audience will receive particular attention. Writing assignments will be project-based and require students to apply writing and communication theories to the development and delivery of effective business texts.

Prerequisites: GEN342 and Junior Level Status or Permission of the Department Chairperson.

Number: GEN421
Credits: 3.00
Type: General Education

  Total General Education Credits 15
 
  Electives  
  Electives (1) 3
  Total Elective Credits 3
Course No.   Semester
Credits
ACC107 Financial Accounting I » 3

Students taking Financial Accounting I will be involved in accounting theory and its applications. In addition, there will be an in-depth study of the nature of assets and liabilities such as: cash, receivables, short-term investments, inventories, plant & equipment, intangibles and the preparation of financial statements. During the semester, emphasis will be placed on journal entries, posting, preparation of month-end financial statements as well as closing and adjusting entries.

Number: ACC107
Credits:
3.00
Type: Accounting

This course allows students to explore a variety of industries of interest to them. The structure of the organizations, competitive activity, consumer attitudes as well as the job functions needed to make each successful will be examined. Students will engage in group discussions regarding the importance of the industry to the consumer and the economy. Students will complete this introductory course with a broad knowledge that can be streamlined to a specific industry in courses that follow.

Number: BUS103
Credits: 3.00
Type: Business Administration

This course surveys the general nature of marketing concepts, process, organization and buyer behavior. It also examines the basic decision areas of product, distribution, promotion, pricing and society’s interaction with the dynamics of marketing.

Number: BUS112
Credits: 3.00
Type: Business Administration

This course examines the fundamental financial problems of business. The student becomes acquainted with financial organization and operation. Current and long-term requirements for capital and analysis of capital structure including planning and control, budgeting and forecasting are examined.

Prerequisite: ACC107 or permission to waive

Number: BUS314
Credits: 3.00
Type: Business Administration

This course will familiarize the student with the problems encountered by the operating management of a business enterprise and the methods used to analyze and solve these problems. Topics include forecasting, productivity, quality management, inventory management, capacity planning, scheduling, production planning, and project management, and the introduction of basic problem solving and project management tools.

Note: This course must be taken during 2nd Semester

Prerequisites: Junior level status and BUS103, GEN305 and OFT115 or DMD101 or NET111

Number: BUS320
Credits: 3.00
Type: Business Administration

This course examines the fundamentals of treasury management. The student becomes acquainted with cash flow management, and short-term investment.

Prerequisites: Junior Level Status with BUS 314, ACC107, and familiarity with Library databases

Number: BUS338
Credits: 3.00
Type: Business Administration

Bailments, checks, drafts, holders in due course, transfers and warranties all interact to provide us with a functioning business/economic system. These terms and devices, their liabilities and protections are discussed and examined in conjunction with debtor/creditor relationships, secured transactions, bankruptcy, agency, and insurance.

Prerequisites: BUS150 and Junior level status

Number: BUS346
Credits: 3.00
Type: Business Administration

The most significant gains in business management in the 21st century have been in the service industry. Banking, business services, consulting, education, franchising, government, healthcare/hospitals, insurance, leisure industry/hotels, news media, personal services, real estate, restaurants, retail, social services, tourism, and waste disposal are just a few examples of “service industries.” This seminar course explores the characteristics of a service economy, its origins, and its impact on economic development nationally and globally. Dominant service sector businesses and their strategies for success are examined along with relevant servicedelivery theories and approaches.

Prerequisite: Junior Level Status

Number: BUS405
Credits: 3.00
Type: Business Administration

This seminar course covers the strategic analysis of major newsworthy events affecting the national and global business environment. The goal of this course is to enable students to develop an awareness of how valuable being “in the know” about current events is integral to business performance and employee productivity. Student participation includes the selection, strategic analysis, and discussion of a current major topic. Relevant and reputable business periodicals and journals will be examined. Students will conduct research and engage in discussion about important current issues that affect business.

Note: Recommended to take during 4th Semester, but not before 3rd Semester

Prerequisite: Junior Level Status

Number: BUS410
Credits: 3.00
Type: Business Administration

This course examines the fundamentals of investment analysis and portfolio management. The student becomes acquainted with investment concepts, global capital markets, the functioning of securities markets, security market indicators, information sources for securities, and portfolio management theories, as well as capital market theory, analysis and valuation of securities, and bond fundamentals and valuations. Rigorous financial report reading for both markets and corporations are included. The Capital Asset Pricing Model, international diversification, and basic derivatives such as puts, calls, limited commodity futures and financial futures will be discussed and analyzed.

Prerequisites: Junior level status with ACC107 and BUS314 or BUS338

Number: BUS420
Credits: 3.00
Type: Business

Course No.   Semester
Credits

Investigation and application of advanced database concepts will be covered including database administration, database technology, and selection and acquisition of database management systems. Through the introduction of Microsoft Access, the students will complete an in-depth practicum in database applications, including database design, relational tables, queries forms, and reports.

Prerequisite: GEN115 or NET111 or DMD101 or permission to waive

Number: CIS233
Credits: 3.00
Type: Computer Information Systems

This course will examine Business Processes Analysis as a method of problem solving. Learners will monitor and evaluate the life of a system and its ability to continue to meet business requirements, and will design and implement modifications and enhancements in response to end-user requests and environmental changes.

Prerequisites: An earned Associate degree or demonstrated proficiency in writing and third semester standing and GEN115 or DMD101 or NET111.

Number: CIS310
Credits: 3.00
Type: Computer Information Systems

Course No.   Semester
Credits
DMD410 Mobile Application Development » 3

This course covers how to develop applications for mobile platforms. The course will enable students to conceptualize, design, build, and implement engaging mobile applications. Students will build on the skills that they have acquired from the prerequisite courses by using their knowledge of interactive design and development, as well as interface design and usability. Differences between mobile and desktop computing will be investigated, sample mobile apps will be dissected, and tool suites for the development of mobile software will be covered.

Prerequisites: DMD227 and DMD310

Number: DMD410
Credits: 3.00
Type: Digital Media

Course No.   Semester
Credits
GEN300 Digital Communications » 3

This transition course serves to provide students with an overview of the fundamental strategies used in contemporary business settings to communicate in the digital age. The course will provide to students at the junior level, who have not had the benefit of associate degree-level digital media courses, to proceed in upper level baccalaureate courses in the Interactive Digital Media and Marketing program.

Prerequisite: Junior Level Status or Permission of the Department Chairperson.

Number: GEN300
Credits: 3.00
Type: General Education

This course will have students study the natural sciences, social sciences and humanities in order to understand the relationship between humans and the natural world – a relationship that underlies current environmental problems. How human-caused changes are affecting our natural world and what solutions can be discovered and put into action are considered.

Prerequisite: Junior Level Status or Permission of the Department Chairperson.

Number: GEN310
Credits: 3.00
Type: General Education

This course features significant themes in American culture and media focusing on the impact of issues such as diversity and gender on work, family life, entertainment, sports and the environment. Students will also examine issues of power related to gender, race, and class and the economic and cultural implications of mass media representation and consumption. Materials for discussion and analysis will be drawn from essays, newspapers, television, advertising, and music. Case studies, class discussions and written essays will be used to develop the topics.

Prerequisite: Junior Level Status or Permission of the Department Chairperson.

Number: GEN324
Credits: 3.00
Type: General Education

A continuation of concepts and theories learned in macroeconomics with an emphasis on economic problem solving. Through guided research and data mining, learners become familiar with the tools of economic analysis and their use as a means of informing economic decisions and policy making.

Prerequisite: GEN183

Number: GEN364
Credits: 3.00
Type: General Education

This course will explore the benefits and risks of doing business in the “Global Village.” The student will explore the benefits of trade between nations and the nature of international banking and foreign exchange rates. Economic stability, cultural and political differences as well as legal and moral problems will be discussed.

Prerequisites: GEN181 or GEN183

Number: GEN365
Credits: 3.00
Type: General Education

This course will introduce the concepts of consumer behavior and decision making. It provides empirical evidence of convergence and divergence in consumer behavior and covers various psychological and sociological aspects of human behavior used for explaining consumer purchasing decisions. It will explore the concept of culture and introduce various models of culture, as well as the affects they have on consumer behavior. Finally, the course will discuss and review how consumer buying behavior and its cultural variations differ across the world.

Prerequisite: BUS112

Number: GEN70
Credits: 3.00
Type: General Education

This honors seminar is designed to introduce highachieving BBA students to research. This credit-bearing course provides select students with an opportunity to conduct original research under the supervision of a faculty researcher. BBA students will learn about the academic research process through presentations, guest lectures and research assignments. At the conclusion of the seminar, student researchers will showcase their research projects at college-sponsored colloquia.

Prerequisites: Junior Level status, 3.5 GPA or better, faculty recommendations, and demonstrated research ability.

Number: GEN415
Credits: 3.00
Type: General Education

Course No.   Semester
Credits
OFT127 Spreadsheet Applications (Excel) » 3

This course introduces Excel spreadsheet concepts using software in the Windows environment. Topics to be covered include: creating the Excel worksheet, formulas, functions, enhancing spreadsheets with graphs and charts, analyzing spreadsheet data (what–if analysis) and working with large worksheets.

Number: OFT127
Credits: 3.00
Type: Office Technology

120 CREDITS REQUIRED FOR GRADUATION


BBA Business Administration Federal Program Disclosure Information - Day Division
BBA Business Administration Federal Program Disclosure Information - Adult Division